The Latin Recording Academy® names Federico Uribe official artist for the 22nd Annual Latin GRAMMY Awards®

October 15, 2021 -- 7:00 am PDT

MIAMI (October 15, 2021) - The Latin Recording Academy® has announced that Colombian visual artist Federico Uribe has been selected as the official artist of the 22nd Annual Latin GRAMMY Awards®. Uribe’s work will be featured prominently on collateral materials before and during the 22nd Annual Latin GRAMMY Awards, which will broadcast live on Univision on Nov. 18 from 8–11 p.m. ET/PT (7 p.m. Central).

“It is a tremendous honor to work alongside an organization that celebrates artistic excellence. I believe that those who create, give. Artists create what they believe and need, and I want to make positive memories with my work,” said Federico Uribe.

"Uribe's artwork is profound and reflective, calling on people to examine their lives. His art and his ability to showcase familiar things in a different light speak to Uribe’s singular perspective," said Manuel Abud, CEO of The Latin Recording Academy. "Uribe’s examination of love, life, music and culture reflects the very elements of Latin music that we cherish and celebrate."

In the artwork created especially for the 22nd Annual Latin GRAMMY Awards, Uribe portrays music through a bouquet of flowers and gramophone horns outlined with cables and connectors. Uribe’s piece illustrates the offering that musicians make to their listeners, and showcases the connections that music creates among people. To illustrate that musical gift in the piece on the cover of the Program Book, he used parts from a sound system discarded by the New World Symphony in Miami. It’s a touch typical of his art, which casts a new light on everyday things. Uribe uses his colorful sculptures of recycled objects — from shoelaces and neckties to bullets and rakes — to create new experiences.

From Bogota, Colombia, Uribe began as a painter, creating chiaroscuros with classical features to express his anger at society. His art offers food for thought about the things we fill our lives with and those that fulfill our lives. At times, he returns objects to nature, using books to erect trees, for instance. His installations often include music that has been specially created to reflect his cultural heritage and life experience in all their richness, from Afro-Colombian rhythms to the chirping of birds. Uribe works in a 5,000-square-foot warehouse in Miami or in his studio surrounded by palm trees in Pereira in the Colombian Andes. He has shown his artwork in galleries and museums throughout the United States and around the world.

Use of 22nd Annual Latin GRAMMY Awards artwork requires express written permission from The Latin Recording Academy. Send requests to Communications.LatinAcademy@grammy.com.

For more information and latest news, visit the official Latin Recording Academy site at www.LatinGRAMMY.com  Follow us on Facebook (LatinGRAMMYs), Twitter (@LatinGRAMMYs) or Instagram (@LatinGRAMMYs), and use #LatinGRAMMY on popular social media platforms.

 

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ABOUT THE LATIN RECORDING ACADEMY:

The Latin Recording Academy is an international nonprofit dedicated to nurturing, celebrating, honoring, and elevating Latin music and its creators. Established as the global authority on Latin music, the membership-based organization composed of music professionals produces the annual Latin GRAMMY Awards, The Biggest Night in Latin Music, which honors excellence in the recording arts and sciences, in addition to providing educational and outreach programs for the music community through its Latin GRAMMY Cultural Foundation®. For more information, please visit LatinGRAMMY.com.

 

ABOUT FEDERICO URIBE:

From Bogota, Colombia, Federico Uribe attended the Universidad de los Andes in Bogotá, the State University of New York and the Instituto Superior de Arte in Havana. He began as a painter, creating chiaroscuros with classical features to express his anger at society. After falling in love, he tried out embroidery and then focused on sculptures. Uribe has shown his artwork in galleries and museums throughout the United States and around the world. He considers his mission accomplished when he sees people from all walks of life respond — whether with an intellectual conversation or a smile — to the art in his installations. He takes particular pleasure in the reactions of children, who, he says, have a greater capacity for surprise. “Artists create what they believe and need,” said Uribe. “I want to make positive memories.”

 

The artist offers food for thought about the things we fill our lives with and those that fulfill our lives. At times, he returns objects to nature, using books to erect trees, for instance. His installations often include music that has been specially created to reflect his cultural heritage and life experience in all their richness, from Afro-Colombian rhythms to the chirping of birds. Whether in a 5,000-square-foot warehouse in Miami or in his studio surrounded by palm trees in Pereira in the Andes of Colombia, Uribe listens to a variety of audio books, from contemporary French literature to essays about the workings of the brain, as he reinvents the castoffs that people gift him. The rest of the day, he nourishes his soul in other ways: waking up to classical music; driving to the strains of old jazz, salsa or vallenato; and, at the end of the day, cooking while listening to “ironing music,” the romantic ballads of 1980s Latin music.

 

MEDIA CONTACTS:

 

The Exclusive Agency on behalf of The Latin Recording Academy

Elina Adut

eadut@eadut.com

 

The Latin Recording Academy

Nathalie Alberto

nathalie.alberto@grammy.com